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Wills Archives

Reading of wills no longer required by states

Nevada residents who have had a loved one recently pass away may be interested to know if they were named in the will. A will is a legal document that allows a person to determine what happens to their estate after they pass away. Wills typically name the beneficiaries and the amount of the estate that they'll receive after the testator's death.

Understanding when and how to move forward with a will contest

Estate plans can be complicated for Nevada residents. After losing a loved one, it can be a surprise for a person to discover that he or she has been excluded from the will. Regardless of why this might have occurred, it is important to keep assumptions at bay and consider how to address the issue. Many strategies have time limitations, so it is wise to act quickly.

Planning for incapacity as part of an estate plan

Some people in Nevada who have created a will or a trust may feel that they have completed all the necessary estate planning documents. However, they may not have prepared documents that deal with becoming incapacitated. A health care directive, also known as a durable health care powers of attorney, a medical directive or a living will, is an important part of this planning, and most Americans do not have one.

Tips to help Nevada residents with estate planning

Typically, when a person dies, a portion of that individual's estate goes to a spouse or child. However, not everyone wants to leave assets to their family members when they pass on. If a person specifically disinherits a child in a will, that son or daughter is entitled to nothing. If a child is to be disinherited, it is important that a child be specifically written out of the will regardless of the quality of the relationship between the potential beneficiary and the deceased parent.

What people should know about family members contesting a will

Nevada residents who have been left out of a family member's will and those making their will may be interested to learn whether a family member can contest a will if they are not included in it. The basic answer is yes. It is possible for a family member to contest the validity of a will.

Points to keep in mind when preparing a will

No one likes thinking about dying, but it is a part of life. If a person, especially a parent, fails to prepare a will, they can put their loved ones in a bind. Here are a few things that Nevada residents should keep in mind as they go about estate planning and prepare their wills.

Estate planning for blended families

Couples in Nevada that marry later in life with children from prior relationships may need to pay special attention to estate planning. When people create a will, they are making decisions about how they want their assets to be distributed. It can be important for people to think about all of the complicated family relationships involved to help ensure the outcomes that they desire. If a person leaves their entire estate to their spouse, it becomes his or her property. This means that there is no guarantee that those assets will be later passed on to children or any other party.

Why couples without kids need estate plans

Couples in Nevada and throughout the country have many reasons to create an estate plan even if they don't have children. For example, they could still have assets that they want to give to friends, family members or charitable organizations. A will can be a powerful tool to help a person transfer assets to the individuals or organization that could benefit the most from it. Without a will, assets may be distributed according to state law.

Young people can benefit from estate planning

Younger people may not have put too much thought into planning for the future of their assets after they pass away. Many millennials do not yet have children, and others have accumulated little in terms of assets. While people may have investment accounts, many often struggle with student loans. People who are single with no children are generally less likely to think about making a will or completing other documents. However, adults of any age can benefit from making an estate plan, especially if they want to provide for pets or have a say in key health care decisions.

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